Startups, Target Go After the Multiracial Hair-Care Market

This article explores some practical tips for caring for and how to manage oily hair. Posted by Michelle L Devon | Last updated: Mar 25, 2013 A common misconception about oily hair is that it is caused by an oily scalp. The exact opposite is usually true. A dry scalp causes the oil glands in the scalp to produce more oil, and once on the scalp, this excess oil transfers to the hair itself. Therefore, to treat oily hair, one of the best things to do is focus on the dry scalp. Below, you will find some hints and tips to help manage and care for oily hair: Use a mild shampoo, shampoo for oily hair, shampoo for dry scalp, or a baby shampoo Wash oily hair daily, but concentrate the shampoo on the hair away from the scalp to remove the excess oil from the hair, not on the scalp itself, because this can dry the scalp even more Always rinse your hair thoroughly with cool or lukewarm water, because soap residue can make oily hair worse Use a hot oil treatment directly on the scalp itself, gently massaging the oil into the scalp and then rinsing the oily hair thoroughly afterward If hair is very oily, do not use conditioner at all, or use conditioner only on the tips or ends of the hair Oily hair is likely shiny enough, so avoid using hair gloss gel or shine hair care products on oily hair For extremely oily hair, a vinegar rinse, comprised of one (1) part vinegar to four (4) parts water can help remove oil from your hair, but be sure to avoid using vinegar on the scalp Dont brush oily hair frequently, because brushing oily hair can actually cause the scalp to produce more oil Dont rub or scratch your scalp when you have oily hair, because stimulating the scalp like this can produce more oil Diluted lemon juice can provide similar results to the vinegar rinse for oily hair with a much more pleasant scent Shampoo that contains tea tree oil can work well for alleviating dry scalp, if dry scalp is the primary cause of the oily hair. While diet has little affect on hair itself, eating a healthy diet and drinking plenty of fluids can help with dry skin and scalp too, and since dry scalp causes oil product that can lead to oily hair, diet can affect how much oil your scalp produces. Drinking water is not only good for your oily hair and dry scalp, but it’s also great for your skin health too. If you follow these tips for managing oily hair, your hair should improve almost immediately, but it may take several weeks of regular hair care to see more permanent results.
For more, check the original version at http://suite101.com/article/oily-hair-care-tips-a18839

In late September, I got a relaxer at my usual salon and got the same “Did you get your hair cut?” response from not only my colleagues, but my on-and-off hairdresser at the time, Betsy. When Betsy asked me, that was when I knew it wasn’t just a “culture thing.” My hair was breaking off. I have to thank Betsy for giving me a jump-start into the world of proper relaxed hair care. She was completely honest with me about the condition of my hair and scalp. In December 2012, I started doing more research about what relaxed hair truly needs. Here are the lessons I have learned on this journey. Get a hairdresser that will tell you the truth. My hairdresser Betsy lets me know if my ends need a trim, if my scalp is too dry or if I don’t need a relaxer just yet. I now wait about 12 weeks, per her recommendation (she has truly taught me that patience is a virtue). She is encouraging but also realistic; we both know it will take a long time to reverse eight years of damage.
For more, check the original version at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/justine-kay/hair-breakage_b_3653568.html

Hair Care for Swimmers

Hair Care for Swimmers

The industry was lacking products that help you embrace your natural curls, says co-founder Wendi Levy. Target decided to showcase six brandsMixed Chicks, Curls, Kinky-Curly, Miss Jessies, Shea Moisture, and Jane Carter Solution, placing them in a prominent spot at the end of the aisle rather than in the ethnic beauty section, where black hair-care products are traditionally sold. The retailer gambled that the products might appeal to a broader spectrum of customers, given thatas U.S. Census data showa growing number of Americans identify themselves as multiracial. The hair-care aisles are really the last bastion of segregation, says Miss Jessies co-founder Titi Branch, who is half-Japanese and half-black. Target ran an eight-week promotion in 400stores. The products took off, says Christina Hennington, the companys vice president of merchandising for health and beauty. To build on the strategys initial success, the retailer has expanded the shelf space devoted to the brands and now sells them at 700stores. Marketing for the section features blown-up photographs of women of different races, whose curls range from kinky to soft ringlets. Last year, CVS ( CVS ), Rite Aid ( RAD ), and Duane Reade ( WAG ) also began carrying some of the products. Combined annual revenue for the five hair-care lines has soared from less than $10million in 2009 to about $150million today, estimates Michael ONeil, vice president of sales at Ultra Distributors, which supplies the products to Target and other large retailers.
For more, check the original version at http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-06-20/startups-target-go-after-the-multiracial-hair-care-market

More black women embracing ‘natural’ hairstyles

There are now more than 36 mousse variations, including chocolate-colored for brunettes, lemon for blondes and strawberry for redheads. For the older crowd, Clairol has a line of Color Foam Mousse ”that washes away the gray.” The price of an aerosol can ranges from $1.99 to $4. The hair-care industry plans other spinoffs using the foam concept. Already on the market are mousses that create permanent curls or waves, and mousse shampoos and conditioners – as well as mousse without alcohol. The alcohol, which is in most mousses to help the product dry quickly and work fast, also tends to dry out hair. At the root of mousse mania is the 80’s trend toward shorter, layered and more styled hair, said John Doran, general manager of the Klorane division of Clairol Inc. Klorane Botanical Beauty Products, which markets the top-selling hair-care line in France, has a more- expensive line of mousse products using herbs imported from southern France. The company has been affiliated with Clairol for 2 1/2 years, Mr. Doran said.
For more, check the original version at http://www.nytimes.com/1985/01/07/business/mousse-mania-in-hair-care.html

‘MOUSSE MANIA’ IN HAIR CARE

One part of the process is learning how to style natural hair. Day, 28, said a good style starts in the shower. Shampooing and conditioning hair is the foundation of the style, she said. She suggested organic and low-sulfate products to clean hair and keep it moisturized.Day added essential oils cleanse the scalp naturally. She sees a lot of women this summer wearing their hair in what are called protective styles such as braids or weaves. Protective styles are those that require little manipulation of the hair, giving tresses a break from daily styling and encouraging hair growth. Braids and twists are popular looks among women for defining the curl pattern, or the way curls grow on a spectrum from wavy to coily. When it comes to nights out, the bouffant and Mohawk are styles of choice for women with longer hair. Braided Cindo, 37, said braids have become increasingly popular.
For more, check the original version at http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/life_and_entertainment/2013/08/04/1-more-black-women-embracing-natural.html

7 Creative Storytelling Campaigns To Promote Shampoos On Social Media

7 Creative Storytelling Campaigns To Promote Shampoos On Social Media image Sunsilk Hair Experts on YouTube

4. Beautiful braids stories for Dove Split End rescue shampoo For the new Dove split end rescue shampoo , the beauty brand launched an exciting blogging contest that asked bloggers to share a story about the beautiful braids they had once upon a time and how they got beautiful ends to their braids once again. The platform also provided samples to try, prior to the contest. 7 Creative Storytelling Campaigns To Promote Shampoos On Social Media The blogging contest required bloggers to provide a linkback to the Dove Facebook page that had more in store involving split ends. A Facebook application Never split ever was created where one could send friendship postcards to her friends! All in all, the idea of promoting the shampoo around beautiful braids and friendship forever is what stands out in this campaign. 5. TRESemme creates a virtual hair salon on YouTube TRESemme wanted to emphasize its products through a ramp ready experience for its consumers. Like Sunsilk, the brand also launched an interactive salon through its YouTube channel hosted by actress and brand ambassador Diana Penty. The virtual salon features DIY videos that take a step-by-step approach for the featured ramp ready hairstyles. 7 Creative Storytelling Campaigns To Promote Shampoos On Social Media You can get an access card and an exclusive backstage entry.
For more, check the original version at http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/advisor/7-creative-storytelling-campaigns-promote-shampoos-social-media-015507479.html

Hair Care Without Chemicals

Ecstatic Dog Loves Birthday Party Balloons (Video)

You must team it with a latex cap for better hair protection. [Read: Natural Ingredients for Healthy Hair ] 2) Apply Hair Conditioner Before hitting the swimming pool, take some conditioner and apply it on your hair. Even though if you wear your swimming cap, pre-condition is a must as the edges of your hair will always get wet.Pre-conditioner helps keeping the hair from the harmful effects of chlorine and other pool chemicals. 3) Use Swimmers Shampoo If you swim a lot, then you must buy yourself shampoo, which is especially for the swimmers. These products contain ingredients that will chelate copper and other metals from your hair, so that they won’t discolor your hair. These shampoos also remove chlorine, chemicals and minerals from your hair. After shampoo, dont forget to moisturize your hair! A light moisturizing spray or a little olive oil will go a long way. [Read: Sport a Fringe this Summer] 4) Healthy hair is less Susceptible Before attending your swimming classes, ensure that you have healthy hair, as it is less susceptible to swimmer’s hair than already damaged hair. In case, you have gone for hair coloring, perming or any other heat-treatment on your hair, your hair is at greater risk for dryness and discoloration. So, keep yourself away from hair processing, so that chlorine won’t get in through split ends.
For more, check the original version at http://www.onlymyhealth.com/hair-care-swimmers-1368448216

Why My Hair Started Breaking Off & 5 Lessons From My Healthy Hair Care Journey (PHOTOS)

hair growth journey

Another option is to make soap and shampoo from everyday oils or with various plants and roots . Your hair may look and act differently at first as it gets used to your new routine, front page and you may have to experiment to find what works for you every head of hair is different, but once you find a way to kick chemicals to the curb, you hair and scalp will enjoy newfound health. 2. Co lor your hair with natural dyes I used to love changing the color of my hair from time to time, but I thought only about the visible changes, and not about the unseen chemicals that were entering my body. Now, Im looking into new ways to add vibrancy to my locks without the toxins. Henna plays a big role in natural hair dyes, and you can buy henna from many health food stores and co-ops. 3. Make sure your hair care isnt hurting the Earth Considering the chemicals I was putting into my hair was my first priority, but another important part of caring for your hair and the planet is making sure that youre using efficient appliances and tallying how many resources your routine eats up. Most hair cair products come in plastic bottles, so if you want to buy your hair care products from the store, keep an eye out for those that are creatively packaged, such as shampoo bars that come in cardboard. Also, dont be afraid to get creative!
For more, check the original version at http://www.care2.com/greenliving/hair-care-without-chemicals-2.html

Debunking Hair Care Myths

Protect your hair in sun and snow: In hot climates, wear a hat in order to protect your hair. Before going to the pool or beach, apply a small amount of strengthening conditioner to the mid-length and ends of hair – this will help reduce some of the harmful effects of salt or chlorine. Also, rinse your hair thoroughly with regular tap water when getting out of the sea/pool. In cold climates, use a humidifier to seal in moisture. Go behind-the-scenes of the L’Oreal laboratories: Get your daily dose of EFA: Essential Fatty Acids (EFA), such as ceramides, are important for scalp and hair health. EFA deficiency can lead to: diffuse hair loss, dull/ brittle hair, dandruff, eczema and splitting nails. Incorporate ceramides into your diet; they can be found in dairy, eggs, soybeans, rice and wheat. One hair chemical at a time: Chemical applications can make hair brittle and more easily broken or tangled by friction or tension. Make sure any chemical processing does not overlap on the hair shaft, as this weakens the hair.
For more, check the original version at http://shine.yahoo.com/latina/debunking-hair-care-myths-232100764.html

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