Is Argan Oil Miraculous?

Science of Kindness – Increase Your Health

Coveted for centuries, Argan Oil is highly prized as both a rich gourmet ingredient for betterment of health, as well as an age-old beauty secret.Studies on the ingesting Argan oil reveal the nutty-flavored oil may have heart-health benefits similar to that of olive oil. As a beauty regime, however, Argan Oil has many benefits. It contains very high levels of Vitamin E and fatty acids, ideal for helping to treat many skin ailments and blemishes. Argan oil has multiple beauty uses. It can be applied to the face, body, hair and cuticles, and is often added to other products. It helps to treat split ends, treat acne, dry and irritated skin, and prevent scarring from unwanted blemishes. Argan Oil is also touted as an effective anti-aging product, helping to minimize fine lines and wrinkles. With so many benefits, it’s no wonder this oil is highly prized and also said to be highly expensive. Now Moroccan Oil, if you haven’t already guessed, yes, this is Argan Oil too. The difference here is Moroccan Oil often has additional ingredients already added to it. These additives can include silicones most often, Aloe Vera, and various other components. Made with Argan oil, Moroccan oil is a lesser pure form of Argan Oil, so if you’re looking for the liquid gold and nothing else, be sure to read the beauty label ingredients. That being said, however, Moroccan Oil still has many of the same great benefits as Argan Oil. It can help improve the appearance of dry, damaged hair, rough skin, and delivers brilliant shine to any mane. So are there any real downsides to using either? Due to the limited supply of Argan Oil, the cost for this natural beauty agent is very high, making price a definite factor in many people’s choice to try it. In addition, the fatty acids found in these oils, while beneficial, can also sometimes cause skin breakouts and acne.
For more, check the original version at http://www.beautyworldnews.com/articles/4361/20130627/argan-oil-vs-moroccan-comes-out-top-best-morocco-beauty-skin-skincare-hair-hair-care-shine-dry-dryness-treat-healthy-acne-breakouts-fatty-acids-anti-aging.htm

Moroccan argan oil: the ‘gold’ that grows on trees

Ripe argan fruits ready to be dried

Tahitian Monoi oil Monoi oil takes coconut oil to the next level. The Tahitians place a fragrant flower (the Tiare flower)into coconut oil for a process called enfleurage. The result is an oil you can use to strengthen your hair, moisturize your body, use as a bath oil or even as a perfume. To deep condition, fortify and add shine to your hair, try using it as a pre-shampoo treatment. Simply apply it to your dry hair, massage into your scalp and let sit for 10 minutes before shampooing hair. One to try is Moana Monoi Oil (Moana Beauty, $25). Marula oil Marula oil from East Africa contains high levels of omega-3 and 9 fatty acids for amazing skin hydration. It also helps to trap moisture on the skin so your skin stays supple longer. This fast absorbing oil contains higher levels of antioxidants than argan or grape seed oil, making it a great choice for anti-aging skin care. Try Pure Marula Oil by The Leakey Collection (dermstore.com, $78). Emu oil Emu oil from Australia comes from an indigenous ostrich-like bird.
For more, check the original version at http://www.sheknows.com/beauty-and-style/articles/976711/best-beauty-oils-more-than-argan-oil

The best beauty oils: More than argan oil

Hazelnut oil

171 get healthy living updates Every year a new crop of super miracle beauty ingredients pops up recently, argan oil has been making the rounds. Generally I pay little attention to these kinds of trends, but I have to say, I find argan oil hugely intriguing. Made from the nuts of the argan tree, which grows almost exclusively in Morocco, the oil is said to have restorative and age-defying effects . It is high in vitamin E and essential fatty acids, it is believed to help all sorts of skin conditions : dry skin, acne, psoriasis, eczema, wrinkles. In a New York Times article, Liz Earle, who runs an organic skin-care line in England, said, When I first found argan oil, I brought it back to the U.K. to have it analyzed it was so remarkably high in vitamin E and had these very interesting phytosterols, which are good for scar tissue and so many other things including, she says, that hard-to-define problem of lackluster skin. I know weve heard these claims before, but still. Argan oil is pretty new in America, but English and French tourists discovered it in Morocco years ago and its all over the markets of Provence, along with the lavender and olive oils . Now, due to the efforts of the Moroccan King Mohammed VI, who has been praised for his efforts to promote womens rights, the oil is being promoted and exported worldwide. What does womens rights have to do with argan oil?
For more, check the original version at http://www.care2.com/greenliving/is-argan-oil-miraculous.html

Argan oil: Find out why celebrities love this liquid gold

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The same deep root systems that make argan trees well adapted to heat and frequent drought in southwestern Morocco also protect the land against soil erosion and desertification. Meanwhile, argan trees provide shade and protection for crops or pastureland, presenting opportunities for agroforestry. Arguably, however, the most noteworthy impact of argan oil production is social. This rare oil has captivated a global audience, primarily because of its use in cosmetics. As a result, market prices have been on the rise (making it the most expensive edible oil in the world), and argan oil producerslargely local Moroccan womenhave been reaping the benefits. Because the process of extracting argan oil is extremely labor intensive (it can take 50 kilograms of seeds to produce just half a liter of oil), the women who produce it by hand are frequently part of production co-operatives, such as the UCFA ( Union des Cooperatives des Femmes de lArganeraie ). Founded in 1999, this innovative co-operative produces and markets argan oil and is supported by the Moroccan government as both a conservation and development strategy. Today, the UCFA unites 22 smaller womens co-operatives. The women who make up these groups gain status, a steady income, and, in some cases, an education through their work. Yet the argan oil boom has been a double-edged sword. Argan trees and the area in which they grow are threatened by overuse and deforestation.
For more, check the original version at http://livinggreenmag.com/2013/05/14/food-health/argan-oil-too-much-of-a-good-thing/

Argan Oil – Dare Eat Nuts Broken By a Goat’s Butt?

In order for the villagers in Morocco to grind the nuts into oil, it must first pass through the intestinal tract, and then the butt of a goat. Some people, he says, on religious grounds will not touch the stuff. But Ive had it on a Sabbath dinner table with religious Moroccan Jews, who love to eat the precious, nutty oil, drizzled over tomatoes. Its very special, and I am enjoying our own little bottle which cost a fortune in Moroccan standards, about $10 USD. Argan oil, I would learn is a precious natural commodity from Morocco, and some villagers are building a cottage industry around it, while UNESCO is working to protect the argan tree. Sources I have read have mentioned that the nuts can be processed without the goat intervention, news which makes me sigh with relief, because I can just imagine what will happen to the worlds goats: being forced to eat argan nuts like foie gras geese who get feed pumped down their throats to enlarge their livers. Apparently there are two kinds of argan oil: one kind is good for your skin, and the other, the kind I have, is argan oil suitable for eating. Wikipedia points out that the traditional methods of collecting argan oil are no longer in practice (well most likely not in practice): Before modern times, the Berbers or Amazighs (indigenous people of Morocco) of this area would collect undigested argan pits from the waste of goats which climb the trees to eat their fruit. The pits were then ground and pressed to make the nutty oil used in cooking and cosmetics. However, the oil used in cosmetic and culinary products available for sale today has most likely been harvested and processed with machines in a verifiably clean and sanitary way. The oil was sold in Moroccan markets even before the Phoenicians arrived, yet the hardy argan tree has been slowly disappearing.
For more, check the original version at http://www.greenprophet.com/2011/05/argan-oil-goat/

Benefits of Argan Oil

argan oil

-Though it is used for adding shine and moisture to hair, Argan oil is also a great oil for your skin. Because it is rich in vitamins like A and E, it is healthy for the skin. It also contains Omega 6 and fatty acids that help plump the skin and retain the moisture. -Known as moringa oil, this comes from the seeds of the moringa tree, and is rich in vitamins A and C, which help reduce the appearance of brown spots on the skin. It is great to fight acne too. -Marula oil is great for most skin types. Apart from being rich in vitamins C and E, it also has many good fatty acids. If you have dry skin, it will help moisture it. -Evening Primrose oil is rich in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), which helps in solving a variety of skin problems, like inflammation, itching, acne and flaking.
For more, check the original version at http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/beauty/Best-oils-to-use-on-your-skin/articleshow/31785890.cms

Through the 1970s and 1980s about 600 hectares per annum was lost. Trees were felled to make way for other crops, or cut down to be sold for wood turning and carving the slow-growing timber is dense and finely figured. Deep ploughing for crop cultivation in and around the argan trees damages their root systems, leaving them more prone to drought stress and death. The newfound popularity of argan oil is having a deleterious impact too; the flow of extra cash has enabled the locals to buy more goats, resulting in more climbing and damage to the trees. Unesco recognition of the argan forests of southwest Morocco as biosphere reserves has not stopped the decline. The irony, of course, is that the further the argan forest retreats, the more the desert creeps forward, rendering the land useless for crops and exposing the soil to wind erosion. Philipp Patrick Ammon Bottles of argan oil Extracting the oil from the drupes is a long and labour-intensive task that has traditionally been undertaken by Berber women; it takes 30kg of fruit and about 15 hours of labour to make one litre of oil. The fruits ripen and fall in late summer (they are never picked) and the dried husks removed. This is where, traditionally, the goats came in, digesting the husk and leaving behind clean kernels in their dung. This stage of production is now frequently bypassed in food oil a goaty musk can occasionally be detected when it hasnt but much of the rest of production is unchanged. It is a process in which nothing goes to waste.
For more, check the original version at http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/1b30e5a2-a53d-11e3-8988-00144feab7de.html

Cosmetics’ Hot Elixir: Argan Oil From Morocco

But you needn’t be an expert to use this product at home. Traces of the ingredient are now a popular addition in many high street hair brands including Kiehl’s and Morrocanoil making it easy to select a protective haircare kit. If you have the real deal, it’s also easy to add the benefits of argan oilinto your daily haircare routine. You canpour some ofthe concentrated product into your usual hair conditioner and leave in for half an hour, focusing on the ends of your hair for a deep treatment. Left over night this oil can work wonders, and if you suffer from a dry scalp thenyouwork the argan oil into the roots as well. Simply wash out the next day with a gentle shampoo and repeat once or twice a week for irresistibly silky smooth hair. While many women are more than happy to embrace the trend of loading up their locks and limbs with natural oils, many of us are moresuspicious about using its mineral-packed properties near our faces. But, because argan oil is incredibly lightweight, it penetrates the skin easily giving you a youthful, dewy glow without any of grease. It’s gentle enough to use on all skin types and is evenbelieved to help with skin conditions including acne and eczema. In fact, oils need less stabilisation than creams (which curdle easily), and so often contain less preservatives or additives which tend to irritate the skin’s surface. A favourite of Marian Cotillard ‘s is La Sultane de Saba Argan Oil which contains 99 per cent of the essential oil alongside rose and vitamin E.
For more, check the original version at http://www.hellomagazine.com/healthandbeauty/2013030511432/argan-oil-skin-hair-benefits/

Argan Oil: Too Much of a Good Thing?

It is also useful in getting rid of dandruff in hair. [Read: Benefits of Shea Butter for Hair ] Medicinal Properties Argan oil is also referred to as the Tree of Life as it has a variety of uses within the medical spectrum. They are as follows: Contains rare Plant sterols not found in other oils that aid inreducing inflammation and helping block cholesterol absorption from the intestines. They also show anti-cancer properties. Oleic acid in Argan oil makes it a practical solution for those who have high cholesterol levels by limitizing and maintaining it. Website-www.arganoilsociety.org dedicated to Argan oil- state that a very small quantity of Argan oil could considerably lower the cholesterol level for over a month.It is thus helpful for stimulating circulation and strengthening the bodys natural immunity. Argan oil facilitates digestion by increasing the concentration of a digestive enzyme called -Pepsin in the gastric juices. This helps aid digestion and acts as a natural anti-inflammatory. Antioxidant Vitamin E is present in a large quantity in Argan oil- which is very good for regulating functioning of the heart and sex organs.
For more, check the original version at http://www.onlymyhealth.com/benefits-argan-oil-1371299282

Best oils to use on your skin

Best oils to use on your skin

Women earn about 40 dirhams, or $4, for a days work Sitting barefoot on blood orange pillows in a village near the seaside resort of Agadir, a dozen Moroccan women in caftans banter while hitting acorn-shaped nuts with stones in metronomic fashiontap, tap, tapuntil they crack, revealing a kernel or two inside. The Berber women earn 40dirhams ($4) for a days work producing about a kilogram of the dime-size kernels, which are ground and pressed to release an oil so rare, so versatile, and so potent that it can sell for the equivalent of $400 a liter in beauty boutiques worldwide. Dubbed liquid gold, amber-hued argan oil is the latest obsession of the $430billion personal-care market. Fans say it strengthens hair, soothes skin, and even tastes good drizzled on a salad. Its turning up everywhere, from Oscar week celebrity gift bags to the aisles of Wal-Mart Stores ( WMT ) and Tesco ( TSCO:LN ). Last year saw the debut of 588 argan oil hair products, according to researcher Mintel, up from 29 in 2008. Its really going quite crazy right now, says Dana Elemara, a former Goldman Sachs ( GS ) bond analyst who runs an argan oil import business in London. The argan craze calls to mind previous beauty fads, like that for jojoba, another gold-tinted oil from arid climates. Jojoba is now found in a wide array of everyday household items, such as liquid hand soap, and its allure has faded. While argan oil risks similar overexposure, its sustainable sourcing and very visible Fairtrade connection to rural Berber women will help preserve its cachet, analysts say. Moroccos exports of argan oil have more than doubled in the past five years, to more than 700 tons, according to government data.
For more, check the original version at http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-07-25/cosmetics-hot-elixir-argan-oil-from-morocco

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